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A University of Alabama Law School Clinical Program funded in part by West Alabama Regional Commission

Advance Health Care Decisions

Powers of Attorney

Wills, Trusts, Estates

Guardianships

Long Term Care Financing

Income Assistance

Nursing Home Issues

Other Consumer Issues:

Funerals
Insurance (non-health)
Abuse
Credit Cards
Identity Theft

D. What to take to your attorney’s office

Deeds to all property you own or have an interest in. It is vital for the lawyer to know how title stands. (Property that is owned “jointly” but not “jointly with right of survivorship” passes differently under Alabama law.)

List of bank accounts, account numbers, where located, names of anyone on the account with you and the approximate balances.

Stocks and bonds, certificate or account numbers, names of owners, when and at what price they were purchased.

Insurance policies or annuities on your life and health.

Retirement (pension) accounts, including the names of the administrator and company from which you retired.

Other retirement accounts, such as IRAs, SEPs, 401K plans, etc., if not listed elsewhere, including account number, approximate balance, beneficiary, basis (amount you invested).

Evidences of debt, such as mortgages, credit card balances, loans or notes to banks or others, including to whom owed, balances, rates of interest and payment amounts and dates due.

Names and addresses of executor/trix and alternate, and trustee if it is possible a minor might inherit, or if you are considering a trust, and a general idea of how you want your property distributed.

Names and addresses of all immediate family members (spouse and children; parents, brothers and sisters if there is no spouse or child); names and ages of grandchildren and of other relatives or non-relatives to whom you wish to leave property. Never leave real property or significant personal property to a minor child. If it is likely that a minor child will inherit, provide the name of a reliable trustee to handle the property until the child reaches an age at which (s)he is reasonably likely to handle it wisely, which may be more than just the age of majority.

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