Symposia

Symposia Podcasts

Most of our symposia sessions are available here for download in MP3/podcast format.

You may download individual sessions or subscribe to the podcast feed via UA Law Symposia podcasts on iTunes or by adding http://www.law.ua.edu/resources/podcasts/symposia/ into your podcast reader.

The Legacy of 1964: Race & Gender Inequity 50 Years Later

Friday, April 4, 2014

Welcome and Introduction
Professor Meredith Render, The University of Alabama School of Law
David Harris, Editor-in- Chief, Alabama Civil Rights & Civil Liberties Law Review
Session I – The Civil Rights Act at 50: An Examination of Title VI I’s Ebb and Flow
Professor Trina Jones, Duke University School of Law
Session II – The Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Law of Property
Professor Al Brophy, University of North Carolina School of Law
Session III – Democracy and Coercion: Race and the Neo-Conservative Backlash
Professor Anthony Cook, Georgetown University Law Center
Session IV – Keynote Speaker: Should Black Women Lean in? What Sheryl Sandberg Doesn’t Understand
Professor Dorothy Brown, Emory University School of Law
Session V – Organizational Complexity and the Quest for Civil Rights
Gregory Parks, Wake Forest University School of Law
Session VI – Language Rights under the Civil Rights Act of 1964: The Case for Juror Language Accommodation
Jasmine Rose Gonzales, University of Pittsburgh School of Law

New York Times v. Sullivan

Friday, February 28, 2014

Opening Remarks
David A. Anderson, University of Texas School of Law
Session I – Reflections of a Civil Rights Lawyer-Activist on New York Times v. Sullivan
Judge U.W. Clemon, Northern District of Alabama (ret.)
Session II – New York Times v. Sullivan Around the World
Mark Tushnet, Harvard Law School
Session III – First Amendment Neighbors
Sonja West, University of Georgia School of Law
Session IV – Keynote Address
Judge Robert Sack, Second Circuit Court of Appeals
Session V – Ambitious Advocacy
David A. Anderson, University of Texas School of Law
Session VI – What the U.S. Supreme Court Thinks of the Press and Why it Matters
Professor RonNell Andersen Jones, Brigham Young University Law School
Session VII – New York Times v. Sullivan and the Legal Attack on the Civil Rights Movement
Christopher Schmidt, Chicago-Kent College of Law
Closing Remarks
David A. Anderson, University of Texas School of Law

A World Without Privacy? What Can/Should Law Do?

Friday, January 17, 2014

Welcome and Introduction
Dean William Brewbaker and Professor Austin Sarat
Session I - Privacy: Observations from a Fifth Columnist
Kevin Haggerty, Professor of Sociology, University of Alberta
Session II - The Yes Men and the Women Men Don’t See
Rebecca Tushnet, Professor of Law, Georgetown University
Session III - Four Privacy Myths
Neil Richards, Professor of Law, Washington University
Session IV - Enough About Me: Why Privacy is About Power, Not Consent or Harm
Lisa M. Austin, Associate Professor, University of Toronto Faculty of Law
Overview and Commentary
Professor Heather Elliott, Law, The University of Alabama

Civility, Legality, and the Limits of Justice

Friday, September 27, 2013

Welcome and Introduction
Professor Austin Sarat
Session I - Disagreement, Contempt, and the Difficult Work of Liberal Civility
Professor Teresa M. Bejan, Political Science, Columbia University, and Professor Bryan Garsten, Political Science, Yale University
Session II - Against Civility: A Feminist Perspective
Professor Linda M. G. Zerilli, Political Science, University of Chicago
Session III - Civility and Formality
Professor Jeremy Waldron, Law, New York University
Session IV – Civility and the Alien
Professor Leti Volpp, Law, University of California, Berkeley
Session V – Overview and Commentary
Professor Heather Elliott, Law, The University of Alabama

The Structure of Standing at 25

Friday, February 22, 2013

Welcome and Introduction
Dean Ken Randall and Professor Heather Elliott
Panel I - The Structure of Standing: History and Text
Robert J. Pushaw, Jr. and Ernest Young
Keynote - “Standing: Who Can Make a Court Listen?”
Judge William Fletcher, United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit
Panel II – The Structure of Standing: Private Rights, Public Rights, and Normative Standards
Jonathan R. Siegel, Maxwell L. Stearns, and F. Andrew Hessick III
Panel III - Suits By and Against Governmental Entities
Thomas D. Rowe, Tara L. Grove, and Heather Elliott

The Punitive Imagination

Friday, September 28, 2012

Welcome and Introduction
Dean Ken Randall and Professor Austin Sarat
Session I – “Imprisonment Without Justice”
Professor Caleb Smith, American Studies and English, Yale University
Session II – “Injustice, Authority and the Criminal Law”
Professor Stephen P. Garvey, Cornell Law School
Session III – “Punishment By Various Other Names”
Professor Leo Katz, University of Pennsylvania School of Law
Session IV - “To See a World in a Grain of Sand”: Dignity and Indignity in American Criminal Justice
Professor Carol S. Steiker, Harvard Law School
Session V - “Which Question? Which Lie?” Reflections on Payne v. Tennessee and the “Quick Glimpse” of Life
Professor Michelle Brown, Sociology, University of Tennessee
Session VI - “Overview and Commentary”
Patricia Ewick, Sociology, Clark University

Civil Rights in the American Story

Friday, March 8, 2013

Welcome and Introduction
Professor Austin Sarat
Session I – The “Myth of a Color Blind Civil Rights Movement”
Professor Mark Brilliant, History and American Studies, University of California Berkeley
Session II – Civil “Rights and the Myth of Moral Progress”
Professor Richard Ford, Stanford Law School
Session IV – “Reframing the Equality Agenda”
Professor Susan Sturm, Columbia Law School

Matters of Faith
October 14, 2011

Welcome and Introduction
Professor Austin Sarat
Session I – “Religion, Law, and Discrimination”
Professor Caroline Mala Corbin, Law, University of Miami
Session II – “Against Neutralism: Faith Based Groups, Discrimination, and State Subsidy”
Professor Corey Brettschneider, Political Science, Brown University
Session III – “Religious Freedom and the Nondiscrimination Norm”
Professor Richard W. Garnett, Law, University of Notre Dame
Session IV – “How Religion Has Grown to Accommodate American Law”
Professor Amanda Porterfield, Religion, Florida State University
Session V – “The Red Herring of Religion”
Professor Steven D. Smith, Law, University of San Diego

Dissenting Voices
Friday, April 8, 2011

Welcome and Introduction
Dean Ken Randall
Session I – “The Ethics of an Alternative: Counterfactuals and the Tone of Dissent”
Professor Ravit Reichman, Brown University
Session II – “Detours and Dead Ends: The Narrative Lines of Dissent in Bowers v. Hardwick and Lawrence v. Texas”
Professor Susanna Lee, Georgetown University
Lunch and Keynote – “Why Societies Don’t Need Dissent (As Such)”
Professor Mark Tushnet, Harvard Law School
Session III – “Dissent in the Legal Academy and the Temptations of Power”
Professor Richard H. Pildes, NYU School of Law
Session IV – “Depression and Dissent: The Idea of Structural Inequality in the Civil Rights Politics of the 1930s”
Professor Kenneth Mack, Harvard Law School

Merciful Judgments
September 24, 2010

Session II – “Mercy, Desert and Criminal Law’s Moral Credibility”
Professor Paul H. Robinson, University of Pennsylvania Law School
Lunch and Keynote – “Justice, Community, and Mercy”
Professor Stephen Macedo, Princeton University and James Staihar, Princeton University and University of Maryland
Session III – “Actions of Mercy”
Professor Alice Ristroph, Seton Hall University School of Law
Session IV – “Mercy, Judgment, and the Epistemology of the “Exception” in the Context of Transitional Justice”
Professor Susan H. Williams, Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Transitions
January 29, 2010

Welcome and Introduction
Dean Ken Randall and Professor Austin Sarat
Session I – “Midnight Deregulation”
Jack Beermann, Professor of Law, Boston University School of Law
Session II – “Midnight Rulemaking and Congress”
Nina Mendelson, Professor of Law, University of Michigan
Lunch and Keynote – “Case Studies in Legal Transitions: Hugo Black and Reconstruction”
Akhil Reed Amar, Professor of Law, Yale University
Session III – “Debating the Global Rule of Law a Half Century After Hart/Fuller: Different Transitions, New Perspectives on Legality and Morality”
Ruti Teitel, Professor of Law, New York Law School

Imagining Legality
September 25, 2009

Welcome and Introduction
Dean Ken Randall and Professor Austin Sarat
Session I – “Trust Us Justice: Law in ’24′”
Desmond Manderson, Canada Research Chair in Law and Discourse, McGill University
Session II – “Real Justice: Law and Order on Reality Television”
Laurie Ouellette, Professor in Communication Studies, University of Minnesota
Lunch and Keynote – “Law’s Screen Life”
Richard K. Sherwin, Professor of Law, New York Law School
Session III – “The Responsibilities of the Cyranoid Citizen”
Anna McCarthy, Associate Professor, Tisch School of Arts, New York University
Session IV – “Law’s Visual Afterlife: Thoughts on Law, Film, and Translation Theory”
Naomi Mezey, Professor of Law, Georgetown Law Center

Speech and Silence in American Law
February 27, 2009

Welcome and Introduction
Dean Ken Randall and Professor Austin Sarat
Session I – “Our Word is Our Bond”
Marianne Constable, Professor of Rhetoric, University of California, Berkeley
Session II – “Sticking It Out or Getting Out: The Law and Morality of Speech, Silence, and Resignation by High Government Officials”
Louis Seidman, Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Constitutional Law, Georgetown Law Center
Session III – “The First Amendment and the Dilemma of Anonymity”
Martin Redish, Louis and Harriet Ancel Professor of Law and Public Policy, Northwestern University
Session IV – “Speech, Silence, the Body”
Peter Brooks, Professor, Yale University

Sovereignty, Emergency, and Legality
October 17, 2008

Session I – “Defined Orderly Ways”
Patrick Gudridge, Professor of Law, University of Miami
Session II – “The Banality of Emergency”
Leonard Feldman, Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Oregon
Lunch and Keynote – “The Organic Law of Ex Parte Miligan”
David Dyzenhaus, Professor of Law, University of Toronto
Session III – “The Racial Sovereign”
Sumi Cho, Professor of Law, DePaul University
Session IV – “Should Constitutional Democracies Redefine Emergencies and the Legal Regimes Suitable for THEM”
Michel Rosenfeld, Professor of Law, Yeshiva University

Legal Doubt, Scientific Certainty
April 11, 2008

Welcome and Introduction
Dean Ken Randall and Professor Austin Sarat
Session I – “Doubting Evidence: Is Skepticism Material to Evidence Law?”
Scott Brewer
Session II – “Whose Science Is Our Science? Institutional Roles in Assessing Science and the Impact of Scientific Knowledge”
Steph Tai
Lunch and Keynote – “Law’s Rules and Nature’s God: Problematic Constructions of Science in the Law”
Sheila Jasanoff
Session III – “Law, Science, and Incommensurability”
O. Carter Snead
Session IV – “Under the Influence of Technology: Evidence, Law, and the Production of Objectivity”
Jennifer Mnookin

Imagining a New Constitution
January 11, 2008

Welcome and Introduction
Dean Ken Randall and Professor Austin Sarat
Session I – “Reconceiving the United States Constitution”
Lorraine Weinrib, University of Toronto School of Law
Session II – “Recognizing the Values Associated w Minority Dominated Institutions”
Heather Gerken, Yale Law School
Lunch and Keynote – “Redesigning the United States Constitution: Is it Desirable? Is it Feasible?”
Sanford Levinson, University of Texas School of Law
Session III – “Recalibrating Checks and Balances: Dividing the Executive”
William Marshall, University of North Carolina School of Law
Session IV – “Government in Opposition: the New Separation of Powers”
David Fontana, George Washington University School of Law

Law’s History
October 19th, 2007

Welcome and Introduction
Dean Ken Randall and Professor Austin Sarat
Session I – “History ‘Lite’ Revisited”
Martin Flaherty, Professor of Law, Fordham Law School
Session II – “Of Vagrants and Wanderers: History and Mythology in Papachristou v. City of Jacksonville”
Risa Goluboff, Associate Professor of Law, University of Virginia School of Law
Session III – “Law, History, and Constitutional Myth-Making”
William J. Novak, Associate Professor of History, The University of Chicago
Session IV – “Law as Public History: How Supreme Court Opinions, Like Historical Monuments, Enable Visions of the Past to Shape the Future”
Mary Dudziak, Professor of Law, History and Political Science, Gould School of Law, University of Southern California