Faculty

John Shahar Dillbary
James M. Kidd, Sr. Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Cross Disciplinary Legal Studies Program
205-348-9988
sdillbary@law.ua.edu

Areas of Expertise:
Antitrust
Economic Analysis Of The Law
Intellectual Property
Torts

John Shahar Dillbary

Professor Dillbary received his B.A. in Economics and LL.B in Law, Summa Cum Laude, from Bar Ilan University, Israel and his masters, with honors, and his doctorate degree from the University of Chicago. At the University of Chicago, he was a Fulbright Scholar and a John M. Olin Scholar in Law and Economics. Professor Dillbary holds a Joint Appointment in the Business School, Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration and he is a member of the Graduate Faculty. He is also the co-director of the Cross-Disciplinary Legal Studies Program. Professor Dillbary teaches antitrust, torts and law and economics.

Professor Dillbary joined the faculty at the University of Alabama in 2007 after practicing law at Weil, Gotshal & Manges, LL.P. in New York where he represented and advised in an array of antitrust and intellectual property matters, including horizontal and vertical arrangements, joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions, patent pools and standard setting. His practice also included false advertising and unfair competition. Professor Dillbary is also admitted to the Israeli Bar where he practiced law with S. Horrowitz, LLP. and then with Meitar, Liqournik, Geva, LL.P. in Tel Aviv until 2002 focusing on complex commercial litigation. During his time at Meitar, he provided legal counsel to private and public companies on matters including shareholders' conflicts, bankruptcy proceedings, trademarks and privacy.

Professor Dillbary taught, presented, lectured and advised, among other places, in North America, Europe, the Middle East and Africa. He is the recipient of the Outstanding Faculty Member Award (2010), the Commitment to Academic Excellence Award (2011), and a two time recipient of the Dean Thomas W. Christopher Award for making a lasting contribution to legal education and the Law School (2012 and 2013). In special recognition of his research and scholarly accomplishments, professor Dillbary was awarded the Dean's Scholar (2013 - 2016). Professor Dillbary's scholarship focuses on antitrust, intellectual property, torts and the intersection between law and economics. His recent work includes:

J. Shahar Dillbary & William Landes (University of Chicago), Book Manuscript (Work in Progress) (under contract).

J. Shahar Dillbary, Contracting for Torts, Wake Forest Law Review (forthcoming 2017) (Lead Article) 

J. Shahar Dillbary, Griffin Edwards and Fredrick Vars, Regulatory Avoidance and Suicide: An Empirical Analysis, Indiana Law Journal (forthcoming 2017).

J. Shahar Dillbary, Causation Actually, 51 Georgia Law Rev. 1 (2016) (Lead Article).

J. Shahar Dillbary, Tort-fest, 80 U. Chi. L. Rev. 953 (2013).

J. Shahar Dillbary, Apportioning Liability Behind a Veil of Uncertainty, 62 Hastings L. J. 1729 (2011).

J. Shahar Dillbary, Predatory Bundling and the Exclusionary Standard, 67 Wash & Lee L. Rev. 1231 (2010) (Lead Article).

J. Shahar Dillbary, Trademarks as a Media for False Advertising, 31 Cardozo. L. Rev. 327 (2009) (Lead Article).

J. Shahar Dillbary, Emergencies, Body Parts and Price Gouging, in Sovereignty, Emergency, Legality, Cambridge University Press, 2009).

J. Shahar Dillbary, Getting the Word Out: The Informational Function of Trademarks, 41 Ariz. St. L.J. 991 (2009).

J. Shahar Dillbary, Famous Trademarks and The Rational Basis For Protecting Irrational Beliefs, 14 Geo. Mason L. Rev. 605 (2007) (Lead Article).

Causation and responsibility are interrelated, crucial, and yet puzzling concepts in law. With tort scholar Shahar Dillbary, we explore situations in which spectators “cause” accidents in a drag race that they merely witness and in which the more tortfeasors there are, the better

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What if you learned that those Niman Ranch steaks you’ve been purchasing for $40 per pound were no longer pasture-raised? What if Aveda, without notifying you, decided to begin testing its products on animals? Or if your Bridgestone tires were no longer union-made? In each of these cases, it would be nearly impossible to detect the change merely by using the product. For an increasing number and variety of products, consumers choose a particular brand or pay premium prices based on imputed qualities that they never experience. Trademark and false advertising law exist to protect consumers from deceptive branding practices, but the situations described above are currently immune from liability. Or at least they will be until more people read Shahar Dillbary’s… Paper: Trademarks as a Media for False Advertising

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