Course Assignments and Cancellations


Course Professor Posted

Advanced Legal Reserach will be held today from 4:30-5:20pm and on Zoom.

No Casebook Required: You do not need to purchase a casebook for Professor Dillbary’s Antitrust class. Instead you will receive reading packets.

TWEN: In preparation for your first class please register for the course’s website on TWEN. The name of the course on TWEN is “Antitrust (Fall 2020)” and it is password protected. An email with the password will be sent to you. If you have not received the password by Monday, Aug. 10 at noon, please contact Ms. Alicia Randolph at ARandolph@law.ua.edu

Syllabus, Packet and Class Schedule: Please pick up the reading packet, the syllabus and the class schedule—they will be available outside of Ms. Randolph office (office number 357 on the third floor) as of Monday, Aug. 10 at noon. You will need both the syllabus and reading packet for your first-class assignment.

First Class & Reading Assignment: The reading assignment for the first class is now posted on TWEN. Please read the assigned materials and come prepared to discuss.

Monday, August 17th Bankruptcy Class will be taught remotely.  Students have been sent an email by Professor Sullivan with instructions.  Please check your Law School email for instructions.

 

Christian Legal Thought

Please register as soon as possible for the course website on TWEN.  Be sure that the email address you provide to the site is accurate and that it is an address you check regularly.  The name of the text and the assignment for the first class appears on the website’s home page.

 

 

"The primary textbook for Prof. Elliott's course is a PDF available on the Blackboard site for her course. You should also have purchased a copy of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (available at the bookstore or online). Your assignments for the first week are: Monday, pages i-ii and 2-32 plus assigned Rules; Wednesday, pages 33-79 plus assigned Rules; and Thursday, pages 80-123 plus assigned Rules. Please note that many of the pages in these assignments are for you to skim, rather than read carefully, as stated on the first page of each assignment."

 

The assignment for the first class requires working in small groups (virtually).  Please check your Alabama Law email address and the Blackboard site for our course—particularly the folder called First Class --for more details about that assignment including the groups in which you should work.  The syllabus and several other resources are also posted on Blackboard.  I look forward to seeing you all on Tuesday for our first class.

 

Please see syllabus on the law school website which includes readings for all class essions and the information for the Zoom Meeting.  Also, please sign up for TWEN.

 

Decedents’ Estates:  Please read the syllabus and casebook pages 1-16 and 29-33 for our first day of class.  The syllabus is available on Blackboard.  You should have received an email from me with a Zoom link.  Please email me if you have not.

 

(Attachment 1 )

Please see attached Professor Andreen's First Class Assignment for Environmental Law I

 

Please check your e-mail for important information regarding our class.  If you have not yet received an e-mail from Ms. Brandi Bosch, please let her know immediately so that you can be added to the class e-mail list. 

--Professor Carodine  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Federal Jurisdiction
Please see the course website on Blackboard (
https://ualearn.blackboard.com/), which includes the Syllabus as well as other important materials and information about the class.  I look forward to meeting you!!

 

 

Health Care Law

Please register as soon as possible for the course website on TWEN.  Be sure that the email address you provide to the site is accurate and that it is an address you check regularly.  The name of the text and the assignment for the first class appears on the website’s home page.

 

 

Immigration Law:
For our first class session, you should read the casebook, pp. 1-11.  You should also skim pp.14-27 on Immigration history.  Finally, you should take a look at the Immigration Priorities Exercise (Available on Blackboard under “Course Materials”).

 

International Business Transactions

 

Fall 2020

 

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

 

Room 172

 

I hope that you and your loved ones are adjusting well to our current situation and are getting to enjoy some calm time after a momentous spring.  I appreciate how you adopted amazingly well to a very difficult situation and continue to do so.  As the fall semester approaches, I wanted to share my current plans with you for the International Business Transactions course. Of course, these plans are subject to change based on the situation in Tuscaloosa and additional requirements that the University might impose.  However, I found that sharing as much information as soon as possible with folks in my spring classes was useful.

 

 First, to the extent I am permitted to do so, I fully intend to hold in person classes at the law school this semester.  I am very hopeful that we will be able to meet in person regularly in light of the most recent university and law school pronouncements, even if we need to follow some special rules to limit risks associated with COVID.

 

 Second, there will be no traditional casebook for the course this fall.  All assignments will come from electronically available materials.  (I will electronically distribute assignment sheets, with relevant links and citations, to help you easily access these materials.)  My principle motivation for this is to lessen burdens on you.  Given that the situation is fluid, I did not want to force anyone to need to secure a casebook when doing so might be difficult, nor to have to lug around physical books when we don’t know all rules pertaining to lockers, the library, and sanitation in the building.  Moreover, I am mindful that many of you may not have had the full benefit of your original summer jobs and associated compensation.  So beyond physical practicalities, I wanted to minimize the financial burden.

 

For the first class, please read:

 

Chad Brooks, Going Global: How to Expand Your Business Internationally, Business News Daily

 

available at https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/8211-expand-business-internationally.html

 

International Law: An Overview available at http://www.law.cornell.edu/topics/international.html

 

Article 38 of the Statute of the International Court of Justice available at https://www.icj-cij.org/en/statute

 

I anticipate a great course, where I will work to provide you with useful knowledge about the practicalities and law associated with international business.  As COVID has strained supply chains and exerted extreme economic pressures, I think the issues that we will discuss are more important than ever.  As with the spring, my biggest focus is on trying to help you all to be safe and well.  Your physical and psychological well being are at the forefront of my thoughts.  Please let me know if I can help in relation to the IBT course or otherwise.

 

Stay safe and well, and I look forward to seeing you in class in August!

 

 Roll tide,

Prof. Rosen

(Attachment 1 )

Please see attached Professor Andreen's First Class Assignment for the International Environmental Law Seminar.

No Casebook Required: You do not need to purchase a casebook for Professor Dillbary’s Law & Economics class. Instead you will receive reading packets.

TWEN: In preparation for your first class please register for the course’s website on TWEN. The name of the course on TWEN is “Law & Economics (Fall 2020)” and it is password protected. An email with the password will be sent to you. If you have not received the password by Monday, Aug. 10 at noon, please contact Ms. Alicia Randolph at ARandolph@law.ua.edu.

Syllabus, Packet and Class Schedule: Please pick up the reading packet, the syllabus and the class schedule—they will be available outside of Ms. Randolph office (office number 357 on the third floor) as of Monday, Aug. 10 at noon. You will need both the syllabus and reading packet for your first-class assignment.

First Class & Reading Assignment: The reading assignment for the first class is now posted on TWEN. Please read the assigned materials and come prepared to discuss.

(Attachment 1 )

Dear Legal Profession students:

I hope you and your loved ones are all well and managing through the continuing upheavals. I'm writing those of you who are registered for this fall's Legal Profession class with me with a couple of important notes. 

First, I need to let you know that for medical reasons, the university has accommodated my need to continue teaching remotely via Zoom. I appreciate that this is not ideal in some respects, for you or for me, although of course there is no way of knowing precisely what will happen to in-person learning in the state or country in the coming weeks and months. I love the classroom and the energy one gets there and from interaction and discussion with all of you in a classroom setting. But personal circumstances require it for me. 

Needless to say, I (like most of your teachers, I think) have been doing what I can this summer to learn more about online teaching and how to make the best use of it. One thing I can assure you is that the class will not simply be an endless series of hour-long lectures from me to you. Where I need to lecture on a rule or bit of material, I will try to keep it briefer and break it up, and/or record it for you to watch so that we can then have a class, possibly shorter in length, devoted to discussing it. I will also focus on using breakout groups, facilitating discussion despite the large numbers for this class by assigning an on-call core group for the week--in advance, so that you can plan and aren't taken by surprise--and focusing on that group for discussion purposes, having guest speakers, polling, using more visuals, and so on. It is possible that I will conduct a few classes (recorded and possibly streamed so others can watch) in the classroom, with a rotating smaller number of students on each occasion, to give and get at least a few days with the vibe of the classroom. But I'm afraid that last possibility is still uncertain. 

Again, I understand that this is not ideal. Some of you are 3Ls and must get the course done before graduation, while some 2Ls may choose to wait a year and hope for the best. I respect any such choices. I can assure you that I'll do my best to work with all of you to make the class as interesting, fun, and painless as possible despite the reliance on remote teaching. There will be growing pains, as there always are, but certainly we are all in a different position from the sudden switchover that occurred in the spring, and the class will be taught with the goal of making it as fulfilling as possible in that medium. Although Legal Profession is a required course and thus people sometimes come to it with the sense of being a captive audience, it's actually a fun topic and a fun, very problem-based book. I would like it to be fun for you--and for me--and will work to make it fun. I will send out a survey before the class starts soliciting your views about what you would like to get or not get from the class and this form of instruction. But don't hesitate to write me any time with your thoughts, suggestions, preferences and aversions, and questions. 

I mentioned the casebook. It's in a new edition, the Fifth. A number of you have written asking whether it's possible to get by with the Fourth Edition. Given the absurd prices of casebooks, I quite understand! In some of my courses I have shifted to my own materials, and I hope to move further in that direction. I teach this course less often, so it's a little less practicable, at least this year, but I dislike the ever-increasing cost of casebooks too. 

On the one hand, my unhappiness about the expense and the fact that you're adults makes me unwilling to simply lay down some kind of law here. On the other, I should note that there have been real changes in the casebook. Unlike a con law casebook that just squeezes in some new cases or reduces some old ones in size, this is a problem-based casebook, and some of the problems, along with other materials and, in some cases, rules, have changed. Certainly some of you need to have the new edition and many of you may want it just to make things easier. And I will be using the Fifth Edition and referring to its page numbers and so on. But if you find ways to make the earlier edition work for yourself, possibly or presumably in collaboration with classmates who have the Fifth Edition, that's fine with me, as long as you're prepared to talk about the materials that are in the current book, do the work to make sure you know where we are given structural changes in the book, and otherwise take responsibility for your end of the class. If it helps you to decide what you want to do or how to do it, I have attached an excerpt from the teacher's manual that discusses some of the major differences between the Fourth and Fifth Editions. I also generally assign a rules supplement for this class. The casebook refers to most of the relevant rules and materials, and if you can get them from other sources with less expense, that's fine with me, as long as you have the text of the rules--and comments; the comments to the Model Rules of Professional Responsibility are as important as the text of the rules themselves--handy when it's time to read and discuss them.

I'll be in further touch shortly, but don't hesitate to reach out if you have questions about either of these matters. 

Yours,

Paul Horwitz

Paul Horwitz
Gordon Rosen Professor
School of Law 
The University of Alabama

Box 870382
Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 

Office: (205) 348-6110 Mobile: (205) 535-6938 
phorwitz@law.ua.edu | https://www.law.ua.edu

 

Legal Writing Sections 7 & 8 – Professor Fogle

Please check your law school email (or the email affiliated with your myBama account) for an email from me with your first class assignment.  Please email me at cfogle@law.ua.edu if you have not received the email by Monday, August 17.  I look forward to meeting you!

 

Legal Writing Sections 3 & 4 – Professor Gamble

Please check your law school email (or the email affiliated with your myBama account) for an email from me with your first class assignment.  Please email me at kgamble@law.ua.edu if you have not received the email by Monday, August 17.  I look forward to meeting you!

 

 

 

 

 

Mental Health Law:  Please read the syllabus and pages 1-20 in the course packet for our first day.  Both are available on Blackboard.  You should have received an email from me with a Zoom link.  Please email me if you have not.

Please access the Payment Systems course Blackboard page. There you will find a number of useful documents that for health reasons will not be distributed in hard copy. Read the syllabus. Prepare class number one on the reading assignment list.

 

Perspectives on Citizenship:

For our first class session, you should read the following:
​​-Handbook, Ch. 1, Schachar, et al. Introduction: Citizenship – Quo Vadis?
-Course packet: Jones, Birthright Citizens, pp. 89-107

 

Welcome to Sales! For our first class on Monday, August 17, please read Assignment 1 (Part D only- skip all cases) in Daniel Keating, Sales: A Systems Approach (6th ed. 2016).  The syllabus for this course, as well as the assignments for the first two weeks of class, are available on Blackboard (202040-LAW-776-001).

Please access the Secured Transactions course Blackboard page. There you will find a number of useful documents that for health concerns will not be distributed in hard copy. Read the syllabus. Prepare class number one on the reading assignment list.

Welcome to Torts! The textbook for our class is Marc A. Franklin, Robert L. Rabin, Michael D. Green & Mark A. Geistfeld, Tort Law and Alternatives (10th ed. 2016). Please read pp. 1–19 for the first day of class.

Casebook and Packet: The casebook for Professor Dillbary’s Torts class is Franklin & Rabin, Tort Law and Alternatives: Cases and Materials (10th Ed. 2016).

Orientation Packet: During Orientation you will receive a packet that includes (1) a Memo, (2) the class schedule with cancellations and make up classes, (3) the syllabus, (3) and a supplemental reading packet. Please review the syllabus and the memo carefully. They include class policies and your first class reading assignment. 

TWEN: During the semester, I will use The Westlaw Educational Network [TWEN] to post reading assignments and supplemental materials. You will receive the passwords for Westlaw and the course’s website (together with a tutorial) during Orientation. After you receive the Westlaw password, you should add “Torts (Fall 2020)” to your TWEN’s website. For more instructions please consult with the syllabus and the library.

Photo: Please email my assistant, Ms. Randolph (arandolph@law.ua.edu) your photo unless you already have an action card (to be used for the class’ seating chart).

First Class & Reading Assignment: For logistical reasons, our first class (only) will take place on Monday, August 17 at 8:15am in Room 187 (all other class sessions, including Monday class sessions, will begin at 9am). The reading assignment for the first class is now posted on TWEN. Please read carefully the assigned materials and come prepared to discuss.